Year A –The Eighth Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 14)

Commentary for August 7, 2001
Click here for today’s readings

Genesis 37:1-4, 12-28
“And they took Joseph to Egypt….”


As the children of Israel read and heard the tagline to this story told for generation after generation, they could look at one another with a knowing smile and nod of the head. The commonly spoken wisdom would have been something like,  “Don’t worry about Joseph, God has a plan for him in Egypt!”


Joseph, of course, gets more press than any of the other patriarchs in Genesis; he has “star power” and is put in place just in time for God to accomplish the salvation of Jacob-now-called-Israel and his extended family. But, it’s a rough ride along the way!


Like ancient Israel, we know that God has a plan for Joseph. Do we trust that God has a plan for us, as well?


Psalm 105: 1-6, 16-22, 45b
Psalm 105 affirms the events of the Joseph saga and offers a theology of providence concerning God’s presence in the midst of Joseph’s difficulties. God’s presence in and purpose for Joseph’s life ultimately are for the benefit of all God’s people. We may face our own “feet hurt with fetters” and “necks bound with iron,” but God’s testing brings blessing when we “seek God’s presence continually.”


1 Kings 19:9-18
Earth, Wind, and Fire. 


Quite a spectacular show that Elijah experiences after his little sulk in the cave. How many of us, preachers and pastors, have felt something akin to Elijah’s emotions after a “great victory” like the one at Mt. Carmel –only to come crashing down to the reality that not everybody is lining up to tell us we’re the greatest servant God has ever sent?


Elijah felt alone — and we serve in a lonely profession sometimes — but the truth was, he wasn’t alone. God was present most stunningly in the sound of sheer silence. Oh, and then there were the other 7,000 servants God had preserved for God’s self in Israel.


You and I may not be called to a cave to understand, but we are never, ever alone. Now move on along.


Psalm 85:8-13
A guest comment from The Rev. Dr. Ruth Hamilton, Assistant to the Secretary of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, with gratitude from the Bubbas:


This afternoon I was looking over the texts for August 7, and encountered one of my favorite medieval motifs:  the four daughters of God.  You will find them in Psalm 85:10-11.  The old translation was “Mercy and Truth have met each other; Justice and Peace have kissed.”  The NRSV doesn’t do it justice.  It is a charming picture.

This motif appears in countless medieval works of art and literature (music, too, if I remember correctly).  It is a scene of reconciliation because the four daughters of God had quarreled after the fall about the fate of humankind.  Truth and Justice demanded punishment.  Mercy and Peace advocated forgiveness.  Through Jesus’ offering of himself on the cross on our behalf, everyone is satisfied.  The strife is ended, all is forgiven.  So they meet and embrace, and God’s household is at one.

It is an image of harmony that always makes me smile.  And I am intrigued with the idea that God has daughters in addition to all those sons.”

Romans 10:5-15
Sometimes, there’s just not much else to be said about a passage of scripture. I feel that way about this section of Romans. Beautiful, just beautiful. Preachers, your feet are beautiful!


Matthew 14:22-33
Even Jesus needed to pray — and, notably, sometimes he prayed all night! I am always reminded that I impoverish my prayer time at my peril when I read this line from the gospel. It is usually the other Dr. Bubba that quotes Martin Luther, but I like these words (feel free to provide a more accurate translation, if you can):


“If I fail to spend two hours in prayer each morning, the devil gets the victory through the day. I have so much business I cannot get on without spending three hours daily in prayer.”


Sermon
by the Rev. Dr. Delmer L. Chilton


Almost 40 years ago I stood in the hallway outside a College Admissions office, sweating uncomfortably in my Sunday Suit and twisting the postcard with the time and place of my appointment in my hands.

I pushed the door open slowly and looked around. I saw a man sitting at his desk, seemingly absorbed in his paperwork. I eased into the room, looking for a place to sit when suddenly he looked up and barked at me, “What are you doing here?”

Startled, I stammered out that I was looking for the Admissions office. He said, “This is it. What are you doing here?”

Again I attempted to answer. “I’m Delmer Chilton and I have an appointment.”

He grunted and said, “I know that, but what are you doing here?”

Know that expression, “Look like a deer in the headlights?” That was me. I was completely bumfuzzled. (My grandma used to say that. I really like that word; bumfuzzled.)

Finally I shrugged my shoulders threw up my hands and said, “I don’t understand the question. You’ve got to help me out here?’

Again the man grunted and said, “What are you doing here? Not here in this room but here in this life? Why do you want to go to college? What is your calling, your purpose, your passion? What are you doing here?”

I don’t know how good that man was at recruiting students; but he sure was good at asking important questions.

Did you notice that his question was the same question that God asked Elijah on the mountain, “What are you doing here?”

At one level it’s a question about why Elijah is hiding in a cave far from where he’s supposed to be. At another level it’s a question about Elijah’s calling in life.

Elijah had been called by God to oppose Ahab and Jezebel, the rulers of Israel.  The king and queen had reintroduced Baal worship and many of the people were adopting it.

There was a big confrontation between Elijah and the priests of Baal that involved the sacrifice of a bull and the calling down of fire from heaven. It’s a real interesting story. It’s in I Kings 18:20-40. You should read it some time.

Anyway, The 400 priests of Baal failed and Elijah succeeded in calling down fire from heaven and the 400 Baal priests were killed, but instead of proving anything to Jezebel and she got mad and decided to have Elijah killed.

And here’s the interesting thing. Elijah had just successfully called down fire from heaven and now he turns tail and runs. After that gigantic demonstration of God’s power, at the first sign of trouble he gives up.

And God comes and finds him in the cave and asks him, “What are you doing here?” “Why did you run away?” Elijah’s answer says it all, because his answer is not about God, it’s all about Elijah. 

“I have been very zealous for the LORD, the God of hosts; for the Israelites have forsaken your covenant, thrown down your altars, and killed your prophets with a sword. I alone am left, and they are seeking my life, to take it away.”

Elijah’s fatal flaw at this moment is that he believes that he is the one who has done good things for God; when in reality it is God who has done good things for the world through Elijah. (Repeat)

This moves to the second meaning of the question, the meaning my College Admissions Officer was getting at. What is your calling, your purpose in life?

Elijah had forgotten that his calling was to serve God and to allow God to work in and through him for the benefit of Israel and ultimately the world.

Moving for a moment to our Gospel story of Jesus walking on the water; we discover that Peter had a similar problem. When he looked at the problems around him, the storm, he forgot that it was God who was holding him up. He began to think, “I can’t do this, I can’t walk on water,” and then began to sink.

Now, let’s be clear here. I’m not talking about some form of “positive thinking,” of “look deep within yourself and believe!” pseudo-psycho-babble.

What I’m talking about is remembering that we don’t do great things for God. God does great things for us, and God does great things through us for the salvation of the world.

Remember when the little WWJD (What Would Jesus Do) bracelets were all the rage? I used to joke about needing a WWPD bracelet; “What Would Peter Do?”  Now there’s a standard I can live up to.

But I was sort of serious about that. The trouble with WWJD is that we are not Jesus, so we can’t do what Jesus would do. That is precisely the point of these stories; we are dependent upon God, and God is trustworthy.

Jesus could walk on water, Peter couldn’t except with God’s help. Elijah didn’t make God send fire from heaven, God sent Elijah to call for the fire.

Way too often we in the church think it’s our job to do great things for God. We want to build big buildings, attract huge crowds, be a “significant” and “important” congregation in our community and denomination.

None of which is bad except if we think that we do those things on our own, as a service to God. We don’t. It is not our calling to be successful, as the world defines success. Rather it is our calling to be faithful, as God defines faith.

It is our calling as the church to Proclaim the Word and Administer the Sacraments, to serve the world in the name of the one who came and served us.

It is our calling to be proclaimers, in words and deeds, of the glorious Good News of the love and Grace of God. How are they to hear without someone to tell them? (Romans 10: 14)

That may result in size and significance in the eyes of the world, and it may not. But that is not the issue.

The issue is to remember that  to say “Jesus is LORD,” is also to say “And I am not.”

The issue is to remember the words of Martin Luther in the Small Catechism, “Not by my own reason and strength can I believe in Jesus Christ my Lord or come to him,” and I would add “or serve him.”

The issue is to remember what we’re doing here.

The issue is to remember that our calling is to be a means of grace in the world, a place and a people through whom God can love and serve the world.

Amen and Amen.

2 thoughts on “Year A –The Eighth Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 14)

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